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View Full Version : Are millenials lazy?



jolau
5.19.16, 9:59 PM
Or have previous generations (especially Baby Boomers) made it near impossible to achieve what these previous generations had?

http://www.itakelibertywithmycoffee.com/2016/05/millennials-arent-lazy-theyre-hurting-baby-boomers-screwed/ (http://www.itakelibertywithmycoffee.com/2016/05/millennials-arent-lazy-theyre-hurting-baby-boomers-screwed/)

Catstrack
5.20.16, 2:11 AM
When I was growing up college meant a vehicle for getting ahead. I worked full time and went to a university who offered night courses and it took me 13 years of night school to get my degree, which was hard with in the last years having a baby to care for, too.

Today is a different time and college may be overrated for some who might be better off learning a trade. May not be as glam as being a doctor or lawyer, but there are trades that are./will be always in demand. Also, coming out of college with tens of thousands of dollars of debt is a huge waste for many to start off life with AND Bernie Sanders is NOT going to be able to make FREE college happen (even is it should).

I would say to millenials....consider looking at trade schools, too. There's no shame in being a blue collar worker.

jolau
5.20.16, 2:52 AM
It just seems harder and harder to get by these days, let alone get ahead. And the bar is often raised that much higher as well. I for one (although by age, I am more of a Generation X, but I probably identify with the Millenials) have probably seen more than my share of doors slammed in my face. Layoffs, firings, and other job changes?

I've also taken a note at what my grandparents could do, vs my parents, vs myself and my sister.
My grandparents could live off one income, (my grandfather ran a laundry) and send their kids to private school K - 12.
My parents lived off two incomes, and sent their kids to private school K - 8/9.5.
My sister is either sending her kids to a charter or public school and both my sister and her husband work.
Meanwhile, I still live with my mother. I've done the trade school thing, and gotten a Bachelor's. I've had to work through college, tried going back for a second degree, and I stopped when I knew full well I can't afford it on my own. Of course, you can forget living out on my own. I've probably been bogged down with so many responsibilities that I barely have time to socialize or do much of anything outside work. People keep telling me I'm young and I can still do things, but I just want to tell such people that I'm OLD and I'm probably going to be single the rest of my life.
Additionally, the K-8 my Mom, my sister, and I went to is now in the process of shutting down, they aren't accepting new enrollments, K - 5 is closed, and the school is staying open mainly to graduate out those in the Jr. High level. The lack of enrollments should tell you that people either can't afford the tuition or they are seeking other options as far as educating their children.

You have to admit, things have gotten progressively harder with each generation.

jolau
5.20.16, 4:20 AM
Also, I'm not sure about trade schools either. I tried that route, and the industry I chose (airliner maintenance) at the time took a downturn just as I was about to get my licenses. Now that industry is on the rebound, and I tried getting in again but many of the skills I learned before are long forgotten. I'm working for an airline right now, but it wasn't in the position I wanted.
I'm looking at a significant raise down the road, but I don't attribute that to "hard work" and "putting the time in". In some scenarios, the reason why I couldn't "put in the time" was something beyond my control.
I attribute that kind of money to finally being in a unionized job that was recently able to negotiate a better pay scale, not necessarily hard work.

Catstrack
5.23.16, 1:30 AM
There are so many variables in life it's sometimes hard to say for sure which of any generation had things harder for particular individuals. My dad's grandparents were farm sharecropper tenants who never owned a home until their adult children bought them a small house in town after granddad had a heart attack and couldn't farm anymore, my dad had an 8th grade education (to go work on the farm until he lied about his age to volunteer for service in WWII when he had just turned 17) and later worked as a furniture salesman from 9-9 everyday and 1-5 on Sundays, working on sales commissions. My mom worked, too. My sister and I always went to public schools and I was the first person on both sides of the family to graduate from college, which I paid for all of it myself. Granted college was more affordable when I graduated in 1986.

Sounds like you and I both came from hard working people who did the best for the family that they could. :-)

Today it is harder for some younger people to find good paying, secure jobs and also it's hard for some older people who lose a job to find similar pay positions, because companies would rather hire younger who they don't have to be concerned with closer retirement programs, etc. I'm not so sure these problems are unique to the millennials tho.

Catstrack
5.23.16, 1:33 AM
Also, I'm not sure about trade schools either. I tried that route, and the industry I chose (airliner maintenance) at the time took a downturn just as I was about to get my licenses. Now that industry is on the rebound, and I tried getting in again but many of the skills I learned before are long forgotten. I'm working for an airline right now, but it wasn't in the position I wanted.
I'm looking at a significant raise down the road, but I don't attribute that to "hard work" and "putting the time in". In some scenarios, the reason why I couldn't "put in the time" was something beyond my control.
I attribute that kind of money to finally being in a unionized job that was recently able to negotiate a better pay scale, not necessarily hard work.

Unions are a godsend to many! Too many companies resist the idea and that's a shame for the employees. Good for you that where you work there is one. :-)

Catstrack
5.23.16, 2:16 AM
[QUOTE=jolau;98289]People keep telling me I'm young and I can still do things, but I just want to tell such people that I'm OLD and I'm probably going to be single the rest of my life. /QUOTE]

Some say good things happen to those who wait as far as relationships. I do believe the old saying that for every kettle there is a lid, so don't up. :-)